CATHOLIC NEWS OF THE WEEK . Saturday, 8 December 2018

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Notice Board - What would prompt you to quit your job?

I think one of the reasons why an individual would leave their job is if they are no longer happy with the work or perhaps the person does not know what he or she really wants to do in life.

Although I am blessed with a good employer, for me, if you know what you want and have the determination to work, you will not mind sacrificing. I am willing to sacrifice no matter how hard the work is for the sake of my family. 

It is better to work hard rather than have the difficulty of finding a job.

However, there is a level to patience and endurance. When physical abuse is inflicted, then that could be the point that I may quit the work. I also believe that as long as I do not forget to call on and trust in God, he will not abandon me. 

 —Rosella Camporedondo

There are some employers who can be unreasonable and refuse to hear explanations from their workers. Lack of food and long hours of work can be exhausting and therefore prompt a worker to quit her job.

For me, I will not quit my job despite the difficulties I may encounter with my employer. I will not quit because I believe that because I got the job I am lucky. So I need to show my employer my willingness.

Besides, staying a long period of time or years with the same employer is a good record for the employee. Otherwise if the employee keeps changing employer, some prospective employer may doubt her ability to carry out her job. This can allow me also to prove to myself that I can do a job no matter how hard it is. 

I am willing to do a job with willingness, joy and patience. I want to show my employer that she did not make the wrong choice when she hired me.

 —Lalaine Garma

There are times when I feel like giving up and just quitting my job after four months. I feel overworked and usually can only retire late at night. On Sundays, after coming home from my holiday, I am unable to rest because of the pile of work waiting for me to finish.

I can still stand the hard work, but there are times I feel hurt by the way my female employer talks to me.

However, every time my wards approach me and show me how they love me, my heart melts with pity for them. Their father just passed away a few weeks ago. Actually, it is the children who give me the stamina to continue my job here. I think perhaps I am still adjusting, since I am also quite new with my present employer. I just put in my mind that my employer is in a grieving stage, which makes her short-tempered.

 —Ivie Lacson

We come to work in Hong Kong because of our families in order to give them a better future. Usually most of us working here as domestic workers would prefer to endure hardship at work and be patient, because we need to support our loved ones. For me, I do not mind long hours of work or the inadequate food given. I can always buy bread or instant noodles.

But one thing that I cannot take and would prompt me to quit my job is when an employer verbally and physically abuses me. There are some employers who can be slave-drivers by using their worker to the full extent, getting what they get for their money and maltreating and abusing them. I may need the job badly, but I cannot allow people to degrade me as a human being. I am blessed that I have a kind and understanding employer.

 —Nadine Lim

My contract with my employer ends this coming November. I have decided not to renew my contract with them for several reasons.

My employer does not give me a regular day off. Sometimes I am only told to have the day off the evening before. No holiday during statutory holidays. Although I am paid for not taking the day off, but I also want to enjoy the holiday.

I have to buy my own breakfast and was not given a food allowance.

My work is 16 hours daily and sometimes it exceeds this. My curfew on my holiday is 7.00pm.

Aside from the reasons mentioned, my employer is a nice person.

I would like to look for other opportunities. That is another reason why I quit.

 

  —Nilda Tejara