CATHOLIC NEWS OF THE WEEK . Saturday, 16 June 2018

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Euthanasia push robs friends and family of joy says dying mother
SYDNEY (CNS): In March, as 50-year-old former nursing educator Anna Corry, lay dying from an aggressive type of breast cancer, she sent out a request to speak publicly about her opposition to euthanasia. She was diagnosed in January 2016. 
 
This January, the parishioner of St. Bernadette’s in suburban Castle Hill, and her husband, Martin, along with their sons, received the news that although chemotherapy had shrunk the 10 centimetre tumour near her heart, the cancer had spread through her body. 
 
Corry died on Holy Thursday, but not before shared her thoughts on euthanasia and assisted suicide with The Catholic Weekly, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Sydney. 
 
Corry said she discovered, through her own experience, arguments against legalising euthanasia that are quite apart from her Catholic faith. 
 
“(People who use euthanasia) are potentially robbing friends and family of beautiful acts of kindness and service which bring them much joy,” she said. 
 
Her family would not have had those experiences “if I had, perhaps 12 or even six months ago, committed suicide through the act of euthanasia.” 
 
Australia will have a voluntary assisted dying law in force in the state of Victoria next year, while a state legislature committee investigates the issue in Western Australia. 
 
Facebook rejects university ad because of San Damiano Cross
STEUBENVILLE (CNS): The Franciscan University of Steubenville said in a blog post on March 30, that one of its advertisements had been rejected because the monitors at Facebook said it contained “shocking content, sensational content, excessively violent content.” 
 
The advertisement targeted by Facebook’s moderators contained the San Damiano Cross, and was part of a series of ads the university posted on March 29 to promote two of its online master’s degree programmes—in theology and in catechetics and evangelisation.
 
The San Damiano Cross is the large Romanesque rood cross that St. Francis of Assisi was praying in front of when he is said to have received the commission from the Lord to rebuild the Catholic Church. 
 
The original cross hangs in the Basilica of St. Clare in Assisi, Italy. 
 
Franciscans cherish it as the symbol of their mission from God. 
 
Mideast patriarchs evoke Resurrection hope in Easter messages
BEIRUT (CNS): In their Easter messages, the Catholic patriarchs of the Middle East evoked the hope of the Resurrection. “Today’s world needs the resurrection of hearts,” said Lebanese Cardinal Bechara Rai, patriarch of Maronite Catholics.
 
Cardinal Rai called for a rekindling of love and compassion and prayed for a return of the displaced and the abducted to their homelands and for wars to end in Syria, Iraq, the Palestinian territories and Yemen, consolidating “a just, comprehensive and lasting peace” in the troubled region. 
 
He also warned that Lebanon’s difficult economic, social and living conditions threatened to destabilise the country’s internal steadiness. 
 
He said he hoped Lebanon’s parliamentary elections on May 6—the first such elections since 2009—would “bring responsible and conscious statesmen.” 
 
Marawi bishop has hopes for better military under new chief of staff
MARAWI (SE): Bishop Edwin dela Peña of Marawi, has expressed hope that the new chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Phlippines, Lt General Carlito Galvez, can make good on crucial reforms needed in the military, CBCP News reported on April 6.
 
Bishop dela Peña has known Galvez for quite some time and was the first person he contacted when Islamic State-inspired terrorists laid siege in the city last year.
 
“He is a very decent officer and gentleman. I hope we can expect a better military under his helm,” CBCP News quoted the bishop as saying.
 
Bishop dela Peña explained that Galvez kept him constantly updated on the situation during the siege of Marawi, including the status of Father Teresito “Chito” Suganob and other civilians who were held hostage by Maute terrorists.
 
“He gave me updates of the crisis from time to time,” the bishop said. 
 
As chief of that Western Mindanao Command, Galvez played a key role in ending the five-month Marawi siege.
 
He succeeds outgoing chief of staff, General Leonardo Guerrero, who retires on April 24.

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