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A great disaster of an unnatural kind

The Four Books by Chinese writer, Yan Lianke, winner of the Franz Kafka Prize, was published in Hong Kong by Mingpao Press in 2010. The book, like many of the author’s titles, is banned on the mainland.








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A precious gift

A few weeks ago Hong Kong hosted the 26th International Congress of The Transplantation Society from August 18 to 22, the first by a Chinese city, indicative that the significant increase in organ donations in China has come under the spotlight.








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What’s eating the young?

On the one hand, the term Hong Kong Kids refers to a phenomenon of pampered children and young people who are unable to take care of their own daily needs. On the other hand, lately young people have become the catalyst of social movements in Hong Kong. 

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The bleakest month of the Cultural Revolution

 

August 1966 was the month when the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution reached its political peak, but threatening omens had appeared much earlier in the year.








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Zacchaeus and China’s religious question

In Luke’s gospel account there is a story about a man whose encounter with Jesus tickles our imagination (19:1-10).








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Honour killing

At this year’s Eighty-eighth Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood, California, the United States of America, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy won an Oscar for her short documentary, A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness, about a young Pakistani woman who survived an attempted honour killing and follows her quest for justice.

The teenage girl named Saba, falls in love with and marries a man in defiance of family orders to enter an arranged marriage.








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The 70th anniversary of Church hierarchy in China (11 April 1946)

On 11 April 1946, Pope Pius XII (1876 to 1958) established the ecclesiastical hierarchy in China—the normal structure of the Catholic Church in a given country.

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The Veil and ethnic relations in China

I take the liberty of quoting some words by Zhang Chengzhi (張넓羚), who once pronounced literature untranslatable. 

Zhang is a Chinese Muslim writer. He grew up in a Hui family in Beijing. The Hui are one of the 56 ethnicities that make up the population of China and are traditionally believers of Islam.








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A new year

 

The Romans began each year by making promises to the god, Janus, for whom the month of January is named.

In Mediaeval times, knights took the peacock vow at the end of the Christmas season each year to re-affirm their commitment to chivalry.








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How might God contemplate China? – a prayer

In his farewell letter, written before he and six brother monks were martyred in 1996, Christian de Chergé, the abbot of the Cistercian Monastery of Tibhirine said:

This is what I shall be able to do, if God wills— 

immerse my gaze in that of the Father, 

and contemplate with him his children of Islam just as he sees them,