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D-Day for chief executive

Just 20 years after Hong Kong returned to Chinese sovereignty, a new chief executive will be selected on March 26 by the 1,194-strong Election Committee.

In 1997, Tung Chee-hwa left the business sector to become the first chief executive of Hong Kong. He was followed by the veteran civil servant, Donald Tsang Yam-kuen. In 2012, Leung Chun-ying, a professional who had also held public office, won selection.








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A sham that demands attention

HONG KONG (SE): The Justice and Peace Commission is urging people to be concerned and take an interest in the selection of the next chief executive, who is set to be chosen from a running pack of three by an elite, small circle Election Committee made up of only 1,194 people on March 26.

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New chief executive waits for the nod

BANGKOK (SE): Over the past few years it has been becoming increasingly apparent that the intensified programme of crushing dissent by the president of China, Xi Jinping, has penetrated the border with Hong Kong and spread its invasive tentacles into the society of the special administrative region.

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Record number apply for Election Committee

HONG KONG (UCAN): A record-breaking number of applications was received by the diocese in Hong Kong to fill the 10 positions allocated to the Catholic Church from the 60 allotted to the religious sector for a seat on the Election Committee that chooses the chief executive.

The diocese received a record 318 applications to fill the 10 spots, a sevenfold up on the last election in 2012. The final 10 were decided by lottery overseen by officials from the Electoral Commission.

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Election Committee screens out candidates

The nomination period for the Election Committee, which will choose the next chief executive of Hong Kong, ended on November 14.

While the Catholic Church is allocated 10 of the 60 seats for the religious sector, Pan-Democrats are running in other sub-sectors in the hope of making an impact on public opinion, setting an election agenda and even affecting a directional change.








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Protestant rumblings over Election Committee

HONG KONG (UCAN): The increasing bickering and polarisation in Hong Kong politics has spread into the Churches, where some criticism over their selection procedures for representatives on the Election Committee that chooses a chief executive has been expressed.

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Conflicting logic in diocesan Electoral Commission criteria

HONG KONG ( SE): Since the first chief executive of Hong Kong was chosen prior to the handover from British to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, the diocese of Hong Kong has maintained the same position on placing its allocation of representatives on the selection body that has the final say in the choice of the top spot in the special administrative region.

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