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China and the Church in 2018

In the relative openness that characterised much of the past decade, the Church in China deepened in maturity and became more sophisticated in its approaches to ministry. Influence within the society grew, as did its relationship with the global Christian community.
 
Today it faces growing scrutiny by a Communist Party that sees its domestic impact and its foreign connections as problematic. 
 








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International importance of Church in China

HONG KONG (SE): The celebration of Christmas in China has gained popularity as its consumer society has taken off, but while it may be more of a commercial affair, Christians use its popularity to point people towards Christ.
 
Brent Fulton, from ChinaSource, says that in churches, rented banquet rooms and even on university campuses, carefully planned celebrations clearly present the gospel.
 
This is in stark contrast to two decades ago.
 

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History-making bishop mourned

FENGXIANG (SE): Bishop Lucas Li Jingfeng, who was emboldened in 1980 to take a step in disobedience to the Church by accepting episcopal ordination from his predecessor in Fengxiang, Bishop Anthony Zhou Weidao, without a mandate from the Holy See, died at 7.20am on November 17.
 

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Xi Jinping Thought on Church pews

HONG KONG (SE): There was nothing unpredictable in the comments on religion in the opening speech given by the president of China, Xi Jinping, at the Nineteenth National Congress of the Communist Party of China in the Great Hall of the People on October 18.
 
His comments had been signalled for some time in a series of new regulations that are now in place and ready to come into effect on February 2 next year.
 

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A foreigner with a Chinese heart

HONG KONG (SE): c was by far the most far-sighted of the modern day advocates of the need for the local Church in China to express the faith and the word of God within the cultural symbols and language of the local culture.
 
As the first apostolic delegate to China, he was a man well ahead of his time in terms of developing the Church that was then known as a foreign mission, and the tremendous contribution that he made to the maturing of the Church in China is now prompting significant numbers of Catholics to call for his beatification.

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Seeking a fuller picture of China’s missionary history

HONG KONG (UCAN): An academic conference on the missionary history of the Paris Foreign Mission Society was described as filling a few gaps in the modern understanding of the development of the Catholic Church over the centuries in China.
 

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Church in China pushed towards taking a further step

ROME (SE): A subscription only magazine published in Rome with the approval of Vatican authorities, La Civilita Cattolica, has taken the Lunar New Year Greeting of Pope Francis to the Chinese people in 2016 one step further.
 
In his greeting, Pope Francis praised the beauty and wisdom of Chinese culture, saying, “… I wish to express my hope that they never lose their historical awareness of being a great people, with a great history of wisdom, and that they have much to offer to the world.”
 

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New online Chinese Christianity Collection

BEIJING (SE): The Kingdom Business College in Beijing teamed up with Globethics.net in Geneva, Switzerland, to launch the Online Chinese Christianity Collection on May 15.
 
A press release from its Beijing office says that it is the largest Online Collection on Chinese Christianity anywhere in the world.
 

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The Cross is Red

ROME (SE): A culture, especially one as old as China’s is not quickly replaced and certainly not by a flimsy ideology, Richard Madsen, from the University of San Diego in the United States of America, explained at the introduction of a symposium in Rome under the title, The Cross is Red.
 

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Power cut for refusing surveillance cameras

HONG KONG (SE): Two parishes in the coastal province of Zhejiang in China discovered that the electricity to the Church compound had been cut off after they had refused to install security cameras.
 
Suddenly, it appears the two buildings have become fire hazards, as immediately after their refusal they were issued with a notice from the fire department saying that the buildings are dangerous when full of people.
 

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