Print Version    Email to Friend
Rule of fear masquerades as society welfare

MANILA (SE): On 24 June 2006, the day that the Philippine congress removed the death penalty from its law books, the lights of the Colosseum in Rome burned brightly.

The shell is a sacred site in the Eternal City, standing as a reminder of the brutality of a bygone age, when it was an execution ground for the unwanted and a venue for the blood sport of the Roman Empire.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Trampled rights in Tibet

MADRID (UCAN): Fifty-eight years ago, a large Tibetan protest against the Chinese government broke out in Lhasa, Tibet, on March 10, which eventually led to the political and spiritual leader of the country, the Dalai Lama, some government officials and tens of thousands of Tibetans fleeing to neighbouring India, Nepal, Bhutan and other countries.

On March 10 this year, exiled Tibetans around the world held a variety of activities to mark the anniversary and called on the Chinese government to improve its policy towards Tibet and resolve the issues that cause so much discontent.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
We’re not hopeless cases

MANILA (SE): The determination of the administration of Rodrigo Duterte to re-imposition the death penalty can mean only one thing, “Filipinos are hopeless cases,” a gathering of young people in Surigao, The Philippines, said on March 22.

“Passing the death penalty is as good as saying that the Filipino people are a hopeless case—that we are not capable of conversion,” the rally, organised by Youth for Christ, acclaimed.

A statement entitled, Life-giving justice not deadly revenge, released by the group challenges the Duterte administration to bring about a positive and influential change in the country.

The group says it is the sworn mandate of the government to improve the quality of life rendering death penalty unnecessary.

“It is… more becoming of a government to help their citizens in their moral transformation rather than putting an end to their life,” the statement says. “Killing a person through capital punishment will take away the opportunity of the person to repent and change.”

Describing the death penalty as a call to revenge and not to justice, the group says, “We want the young people to continue valuing life no matter how deformed and depraved it may be. We want to teach the young people not to (seek) revenge, but to promote transformative justice for everyone,” CBCP News reported.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Exile exposes Vietnam’s treatment of dissidents

HANOI (UCAN): A Vietnamese Catholic social advocate in exile, Francis Xavier Dang Xuan Dieu, has backed up a claim from Amnesty International that his country is guilty of physically and mentally torturing prisoners of conscience.

During a human rights summit, Dieu described treatment meted out to prisoners of conscience in the Communist country.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Asia-Pacific sees 900 million pay bribes

BANGKOK (SE): Bribery takes place at all levels of society and is an insidious reality, as it takes food off the table, but on another level puts food on the table.

For lowly paid public servants and service providers, withholding their services until the palm is greased can be the difference between having food or not, but for the hapless searcher of a necessary service, the table can be bare.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
A journalist’s lot is not an easy one

SELANGOR (AsiaNews): “We cannot sell our magazines in public,” a Pakistani journalist told the Asia Journalists Roundtable in Selangor in Malaysia on March 10. Indeed, “We cannot pin our name to stories of persecution.”

The Asia Journalists’ Roundtable was sponsored by the Centre of the Council of Churches of Malaysia and organised by SIGNIS, the World Catholic Association for Communication, to highlight the problems that minority group media face.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Bishops cop a tough ask

MANILA (SE): The bishops have copped a tough ask from the chief of the Philippine National Police, Ronald dela Rosa, when he called for a little bit of trust from the Church in the national campaign against drugs, which to date has left almost 8,000 dead bodies, mostly of poor people, strewn around the country.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Togolese ordained in Taiwan

KAOHSIUNG (UCAN): Inspired by a 19th century missionary to China, Father Joseph Youta Djiba, from Togo, was ordained in Taiwan on February 18 for the Chinese province of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD).

Archbishop John Hung Shan-chuan, from Taipei, who is a member of the same congregation, ordained the young Togolese at Our Lady of Fatima church in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Only Filipinos to kill Filipinos!

MANILA (UCAN): In what is a strange irony, The Promotion of Church People’s Response has requested the Philippine government, which is currently moving closer to reinstating the death penalty, to appeal to the government of the United Arab Emirates to refrain from executing a Filipino migrant worker, 30-year-old Jennifer Dalquez, who is convicted of murdering her employer.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Insidious diluting of the Kill Bill

MANILA (SE): In the face of mounting opposition from both the general public and the senate to a proposal before the congress to reintroduce the death penalty in The Philippines, the list of crimes that could see an offender go to the gallows, the lethal injection room or stand in front of a firing squad has been considerably trimmed from its original 21.

Those that are being kept on the bill are the rarely invoked crimes of treason and plunder, but significantly a wide variety of drug-related offences.

More from this section