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Bible without religion

MANILA (SE) : In one breath, the president of The Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, told his people that they should not believe in religion, especially the Catholic religion, and in the next intake of air on January 5, declared January National Bible Month.

By signing a proclamation announcing the Bible Month he seems to be advocating the value of the bible without religion. 

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Flocking for a miracle

MANILA (SE): Around one-and-a-half-million people joined the procession of the Black Nazarene through the streets of Manila on January 9 to mark the 411th year of the arrival of the famous statue in The Philippines from Mexico.

The day, which began with midnight Mass offered by the archbishop of Manila, Luis Cardinal Tagle, at the Quirino Grandstand, was anticipated to involve up to 18 million people at its various functions during the day.

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Peace is process not agreement

CAGAYAN DE ORO (SE): The long stalled peace talks between the government and the National Democratic Front of the Communist Party of The Philippines got off the ground in Oslo, Norway, on August 22 last year in a flurry of excitement, which soured as quickly as it was generated by October 8 in their second round.

Nevertheless, the Ecumenical Peace Platform has called on both parties not to give up, but to look at peace-making as a process rather than a negotiation.

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Can Philippines scratch the surface of its faith?

MANILA (UCAN): In just four months, official figures released by the Philippine National Police show that around 4,500 people have become victims of extrajudicial murder under the guise of the war on drugs instigated by the current president, Rodrigo Duterte.

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Death penalty resurrects as democracy wanes

MANILA (SE): Countries across the world today have been systematically taking the death penalty off their law books as democracy within their borders strengthens, but recently, as the power of the people has been waning in many traditional democracies, it is gradually being reintroduced.

The Philippines is no exception and as the current president, Rodrigo Duterte, ups the ante in his rule of fear over the country, the blood-soaked soil of the land has made it fertile ground for its reintroduction.

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Vatican judges apparition inauthentic

LIPA (UCAN): A Vatican decision overruling the local bishop on the validity of reported miracles and Marian apparitions at the Carmelite Monastery in Lipa, The Philippines, around 60 years ago has left some people confused.

“People are unhappy, unsatisfied and not at peace with themselves,” retired Archbishop Oscar Cruz said, adding that some followers of Our Lady of Mediatrix of All Graces have been asking for some sort of a review.

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An unwanted vice

MANILA (SE): The president of The Philippines has kicked his vice president, Leni Robredo, out of the cabinet over her opposition to his signature policy of murdering the poor and pet passion of currying favour with the Marcos family.

Robredo staved off Ferdinand Marcos Jr. to be elected vice president, but it is becoming more obvious that Duterte wants to be rid of her and cozy up to the son of the late dictator, whom he has already introduced to China as his vice.

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No child soldiers please

MANILA (SE): Archbishop Martin Jumoad called on the Philippine government to act immediately to put an end to the recruitment of children by dissident groups as soldiers.

Speaking after being installed as archbishop of Ozamiz, CBCP News reported him as saying, “Our government must double its efforts to win the sympathy of our young people on the side of goodness.”

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One of the Magnificent Seven etched in history

MANILA (UCAN): The late Bishop Julio Xavier Labayen, from Infanta, was the inspiration behind the Magnificent Seven who gathered to sign an open letter challenging the martial law president, Ferdinand Marcos, over his human rights abuses in 1973.

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Poverty is the best drug pusher

There was Jonathan, a 16-year-old teenager from a broken home where love no longer held a family together. Poverty that kept food from the table and from the mouths of his brother and sisters.

Jonathan saw the last of his father as he stormed out of their shanty by a river in the Philippine capital, drunk on cheap liquor to numb the pain of failure. He was a jobless man, fired by a corrupt boss. He was a useless, broken man, his dignity taken from him.