Print Version    Email to Friend
Hammer and sickle censorship jams Down Under printing presses

HONG KONG (SE): The long arm of hammer and sickle censorship has reached the presses of Allen & Unwin, Australia’s leading publisher and longtime promoter of academic literature.
 
It made a sudden decision to return the manuscript to the author of a book called, Silent Invasion: How China is turning Australia into a puppet state, by Adelaide academic, Clive Hamilton, for what are being described as spurious reasons.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Espionage in the lecture hall or bewildered students?

HONG KONG (SE): The machinations of the United Work Front Department outside of China and meddling in local affairs by Beijing are currently being criticised at both a high level and with great seriousness in Australia.
 
Speaking at a Confucius Institute in Adelaide in October, the country’s top ranking diplomat, the secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Frances Adamson, warned international students that freedom of speech is a highly treasured Australian value and that they are not invited to interfere in that.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Will Catholics swing for same-sex marriage?

SYDNEY (SE): As Australia prepares for a postal survey on attitudes towards same-sex marriage, a poll commissioned by the Equality Campaign conducted by Jim Reed from Newgate Research claims that more than half of the country’s Catholics are likely vote in favour of it.
 
The poll discovered that approximately 66 per cent of the overall population is inclined to express a favourable opinion on the question, but among those who adhere to a religion only 58 per cent said they would favour the idea.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Confessional seal challenged

SYDNEY (SE): The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has recommended that Australian states and territories introduce legislation to overrule the long held sacred nature of the seal of the confessional.
 
If carried out in the six states and two territories the legislation would demand that priests from across the country comply with a mandatory reporting to police requirement in the event of anyone confessing to child sexual abuse.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Behind the hollow headlines

MELBOURNE (SE): News of the 20th anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong from British to Chinese sovereignty set to be celebrated on July 1 overshadowed the headlines in Australian newspapers on June 29 when police in Melbourne announced that George Cardinal Pell had become the highest ranking Church official ever to be charged with sexual offences.
 
A former archbishop of both Sydney and Melbourne, and currently the prefect for the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy, Cardinal Pell is to face the court in Melbourne on July 26.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Sydney sees biggest ever petition to parliament

SYDNEY (SE): Members of the Legislative Council (upper house) in the state parliament of New South Wales in Australia sat in silence as a history-making petition was tabled by Labour member, Greg Donnelly.
 
The petition, bearing 55,559 signatures, was tabled in opposition to an Abortion Law Reform Bill filed and authored by the Greens Party member, Mehreen Faruqi.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Australian shame has message for worldwide Church

SYDNEY (SE): The 21 days of shame of the Church in Australia reached its 14th day on February 17, but tended to drop out of the news as the submissions being made to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse were focussed more on structural problems rather the grizzly details that dominated the first week.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Day of shame for Church in Australia

SYDNEY (SE): On February 6, the Catholic Church in Australia began its 21 days of shame, as the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse launched its final intensive review of the response of the Catholic Church to the crisis at a hearing in Sydney that will involve more than 60 witnesses, including the archbishops of the six most influential dioceses.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Australia joins China in thumbing nose at international law

DILI (UCAN): Australia is showing that China is not the only bully in the region that is prepared to thumb its nose at international law and use its financial clout to kick its weaker neighbours around.

It is currently digging its heels in and refusing to renegotiate on the delicate issue of maritime boundaries between its huge land mass and its tiny neighbour, Timor-Leste, in a dispute in which billions of dollars’ worth of oil and gas reserves are at stake.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Get political the Australian bishops urge their people

SYDNEY (SE): As Australia wades through its longest ever election campaign on the torturous road to the July 2 polling day, the bishops of the Land Down Under have released a strong appeal for Christians to pressure political parties for an end to what they call the throwaway culture espoused by the two candidates for the top job, the incumbent prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, and opposition leader, Bill Shorten.

More from this section