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The criminalising of Tibetan culture

Liang Xiaojun, a defense lawyer for Tibetan language advocate, Tashi Wangchuk, posted a message on his Twitter account on August 22 relaying the verdict in Tashi’s appeal after he was charged with inciting separatism for seeking broader inclusion of the language in the local curriculum.
 
On May 22, the Yushu Intermediate Court in China’s western Qinghai province, had sentenced him to five years in jail,- and the Qinghai Higher People’s Court found no reason to overrule this.
 

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Jailed for protecting Tibetan language and culture

On the morning of May 22, the Yushu Intermediate Court in China’s Qinghai province, sentenced shopkeeper and Tibetan language advocate, Tashi Wangchuk (also known as Tashi Woeser), to five years in jail for inciting separatism.
 








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Trampled rights in Tibet

MADRID (UCAN): Fifty-eight years ago, a large Tibetan protest against the Chinese government broke out in Lhasa, Tibet, on March 10, which eventually led to the political and spiritual leader of the country, the Dalai Lama, some government officials and tens of thousands of Tibetans fleeing to neighbouring India, Nepal, Bhutan and other countries.

On March 10 this year, exiled Tibetans around the world held a variety of activities to mark the anniversary and called on the Chinese government to improve its policy towards Tibet and resolve the issues that cause so much discontent.

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China battens down hatches on Tibet

LHASA (SE): Human Rights Watch is critical of Beijing for staging a massive military parade in Lhasa, Tibet, just one week prior to the marking of the failed 1959 uprising that saw China finally put its stranglehold on the country.

Lhasa became a military fortress when some 5,000 troops carrying guns and shields accompanied by about 1,000 military and anti-riot vehicles marched through the streets of the Tibetan capital on March 3, just seven days prior to the March 10 anniversary.

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Dalai Lama is public enemy number one

LHASA (AsiaNews): The Dalai Lama was declared public enemy number one by Wu Yingjie,  the Communist Party secretary in Tibet.

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Naming the Dalai Lama is not China’s business

BEIJING (UCAN): Lobsang Sangay, the exiled political leader of Tibet’s government in exile, likened an announcement that Beijing would appoint the successor to the Dalai Lama as equivalent to Cuba’s one-time dictator, Fidel Castro, appointing the next pope.

Sangay’s comment follows insistence by the Communist Party of China that it alone will decide who is the reincarnation of the ailing 80-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader.

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Counter-espionage in the monastery

BEIJING (UCAN): China has started training Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns in counter-espionage in its latest effort to manage  religious personnel deemed to be a threat to Communist Party power.

Twenty-two monks and nuns were instructed on a vague anti-spying law passed a year ago during a three-hour session led by security officials at Lamaling Temple in Nyingchi.

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Tibet Autonomous Region sees environment and freedoms melting away

Lhasa (Agencies): Schoolchildren waved flags while troops marched in full battle dress as authorities staged a mass rally with fireworks on September 8 in Lhasa to mark 50 years since the incorporation of Tibet into the People’s Republic of China as the Tibet Autonomous Region in 1965, reported AsiaNews.it.

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