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Beijing’s big bucks muffle religious protest in Southeast Asia

Simon Roughneen 
 
A year ago the United States moved its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, sparking protests in Muslim-majority countries and drawing official condemnation at the United Nations (UN).
 
An estimated 30,000 people demonstrated in Jakarta, Indonesia, as the president, Joko Widodo, said his country “rejects” the American move as it “may disrupt the peace process in Israel and Palestine.”

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Complaint filed against Xi Jinping for crimes against humanity

MANILA (UCAN): Former Philippine Foreign Affairs secretary, Albert del Rosario, and former Ombudsman, Conchita Carpio-Morales, along with a group of Filipino fishermen, filed a complaint—formally called a communication—before the International Criminal Court (ICC) against Chinese President Xi Jinping for alleged “crimes against humanity” on March 15.
 
They accused Xi and Chinese officials of causing environmental damage in the South China Sea.
 

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Tribal groups protest visit of Xi Jinping to Philippines

HONG KONG (SE): Tribal groups in the Philippines have vowed to hold protests when China’s president, Xi Jinping, visits from November 19.
 
His visit is expected to herald more development aid and progress on joint undersea fuel exploration for the Philippines.
 
However, the Network Opposed to Kaliwa-Kanan-Laiban Dam, an alliance of tribal groups, called on the Chinese government to pull out of committed loans and projects that will have a catastrophic effect on tribal lands.
 

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Faulty vaccine scandal sparks outrage in China

HONG KONG (UCAN): Paul, a doctor in China said that revelations that major vaccine makers violated safety standards showed that the country has no moral boundaries, leading people to do whatever they want for their own interests. He quoted a priest in his parish who said: “China’s leaders and bigwigs at all levels have no beliefs and no moral boundaries, so they will do whatever they want.”
 
Public anger has been mounting since the information came to light in July.
 

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Gratitude and anguish at Xi’s address

HONG KONG (UCAN): Responses from religious groups to remarks made by the president of China, Xi Jinping, during his epic address at the opening of the National Party Congress on October 18 in the Great Hall of the People vary radically, depending on which side the political fence they originate from.
 

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Xi Jinping Thought on Church pews

HONG KONG (SE): There was nothing unpredictable in the comments on religion in the opening speech given by the president of China, Xi Jinping, at the Nineteenth National Congress of the Communist Party of China in the Great Hall of the People on October 18.
 
His comments had been signalled for some time in a series of new regulations that are now in place and ready to come into effect on February 2 next year.
 

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No good news for religion at Party Congress

HONG KONG (SE): During his three-and-a-half hour presentation at the beginning of the Nineteenth Congress of the Communist Party of China, the general secretary of the party and president of China, Xi Jinping, embedded the process of Sinicisation of religion into what is anticipated to become a dogma of belief under the banner of the Thoughts of Xi Jinping.
 

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What’s not to like about Winnie the Pooh?

BEIJING (AsiaNews): Wang Xiaochuan, the chief executive of the web search engine Sogou, posted a seemingly innocent image of Winnie the Pooh on his Weibo account on July 15, but it attracted a lot of surprised attention, as the image has been banned in China since 2013.
 
The loveable bear from the stories by A. A. Milne and the animated movies from Disney Studios is regarded as an offensive character by Chinese censors because of its physical resemblance to the president, Xi Jinping.
 

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The dilemma of no one left to vote for

HONG KONG (SE): In response to the question, “Who won the presidential election in France on May 6?” a reader glued to The Global Times on the mainland could well be forgiven for answering, “China!”
 
The paper trumpeted the success of Emmanuel Macron over Marine Le Pen as a victory for human civilisation, which can be credited with doing much to turn back the encroaching attack on humanity, which it also implied is being led by the likes of Le Pen.
 

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New Year with Xi Jinping

BEIJING (SE): Standing before a mural of the Great Wall for his end of year address on December 31, the president of China, Xi Jinping, said his administration had resolutely defended its territorial sovereignty and maritime rights during the past year.

“If anyone makes this an issue of question, the Chinese people will never agree!” he said in a noticeably higher pitch than the rest of his 10-minute address.

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