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Tough times today may herald tougher times to come

HONG KONG (UCAN): China convened its 19th National Congress of the Communist Party on October 18.
 
Regarded as a major high profile gathering every five years, this time round it is expected that the president, Xi Jinping, will be endorsed for a second term in the top job of the Communist Party.
 
But this may not be welcome news for religious minorities on the mainland, as to say it has been a tough year for them would be a gross understatement.
 

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Beijing-Holy See relations neither on earth nor as it is in heaven

HONG KONG (UCAN): The Holy See is not seeking to form diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of China, but it does have a focus on forming a relationship that could resolve the thorny issue of the being able to appoint bishops according to the laws and traditions of the Church.
 
Yet this relationship, which is neither on earth nor as it is in heaven, has been vexing the Vatican for decades.
 

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Beijing’s meddling with personnel a new headache for Vatican

HONG KONG (UCAN): The two government appointed Catholic bodies, the Bishops’ Conference of the Catholic Church in China and the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association, have released revised constitutions placing Sinicisation at the centre of their operational philosophy.

The new emphasis in the constitutions of the two bodies is being interpreted as part of a broader strategy by Beijing to put a stronger Chinese flavour into religion, which also means a stronger Communist socialist ethic.

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Sinicise or bust

HONG KONG (UCAN): Authorities overseeing the life of religious communities and Churches in China told a group of bishops and Church leaders they must Sinicise or bust.

At a gathering soon after Beijing concluded its hushed meetings with a Vatican delegation in October, the Church leaders were told that they must insist on a process of Sinicisation being implemented in their communities.

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