Print Version    Email to Friend
Vietnam deal points way for China-Vatican progress

Michael Sainsbury
 
In 2002 Pope St. John Paul made the appointment that would underpin the Catholic Church’s efforts to begin repairing relations with Asia’s two main communist states, China and Vietnam, when he named Monsignor Pietro Parolin as undersecretary of state for relations with states in the Secretariat of State.
 








Print Version    Email to Friend
A Tibetan view of the Sino-Vatican agreement

Sang Jieja
 
After years of negotiations, the Vatican and China finally announced in late September that a consensus had been reached on the appointment of Chinese bishops and the two sides signed a provisional agreement.
 
As a Tibetan bystander, I wasn’t optimistic about the agreement. I have been subjected to violations by the Chinese government for more than 60 years.
 








Print Version    Email to Friend
Two steps forward, one step back: Vatican diplomacy with China

Michael Sainsbury 
 
When Deng Xiaoping took charge of the Chinese Communist Party in late 1978 and announced his programme of reform, it was the beginning of the end of 39 years of isolation for China’s Christians.
 








Print Version    Email to Friend
Who are the kite runners?

HONG KONG (SE): After several reports appeared recently pointing to hiccups in the current round of talks taking place between the Holy See and Beijing, the Vatican secretary of state, Pietro Cardinal Parolin, admitted in his diplomatic way that things are rocky, saying that new challenges had been presented.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Vatican admits talks with Beijing rocky

VATICAN (UCAN): While the ongoing talks between the Holy See and Beijing have been described by commentators as hitting a rocky patch, the Vatican secretary of state, Pietro Cardinal Parolin, said on August 2 that discussion over the appointment of bishops has presented new challenges.
 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
What’s in Vatican negotiations for China?

HONG KONG (SE): The benefits of an equitable agreement coming out of the ongoing Vatican-Beijing dialogue seem obvious enough for the Catholic Church, but no one enters into an international negotiation unless there is something in it for them as well, so what’s in it for China?

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
A reflection on Cardinal Tong’s view of Vatican-Beijing negotiations

SAN DIEGO (SE): Although there are converging interests between China and the Vatican on the appointments of bishops, the two hold quite different agendas in the current, much-discussed negotiations between the two parties.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
The future of the Sino-Vatican dialogue from an ecclesiological point of view

By John Cardinal Tong

 

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
China and Vietnam are unrelated realities

HONG KONG (UCAN): Government-sanctioned Catholic organisations in China held their Ninth National Congress for Catholic Representatives in December 2016.

What is worrying is that this congress claims to be the supervisor of the Bishops’ Conference of the Catholic Church in China, while the conference itself claims authority over individual diocesan bishops.

Neither of these two practices are compatible with Canon Law or the doctrine of the Catholic Church.

More from this section






Print Version    Email to Friend
Conflicting conversations in the Church in China

HONG KONG (SE): “If you had asked me one year ago about the chances of a deal (between the Vatican and Beijing), I would have said remote to nil,” Ian Johnson, the author of Wild Grass, a reflection on civil society and grassroots protest in China, said in a blog posted on SupChina on January 6.

More from this section