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The censorship polemic

HONG KONG (SE): After the Cambridge University Press confirmed publicly that it had received an instruction from a Chinese import agency to block individual articles from The China Quarterly within China, it said on August 18 that it would comply for the sake of being able to make the bulk of its material available (Sunday Examiner, August 27), but would not change its editorial line to appease China.
 

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Censor’s knife cuts deep into academe

CAMBRIDGE (SE): “We can confirm that we received an instruction from a Chinese import agency to block individual articles from The China Quarterly within China. We complied with this initial request to remove individual articles, to ensure that other academic and educational materials we publish remain available to researchers and educators in this market,” a press release from Cambridge University Press published on August 18 says.
 

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What’s not to like about Winnie the Pooh?

BEIJING (AsiaNews): Wang Xiaochuan, the chief executive of the web search engine Sogou, posted a seemingly innocent image of Winnie the Pooh on his Weibo account on July 15, but it attracted a lot of surprised attention, as the image has been banned in China since 2013.
 
The loveable bear from the stories by A. A. Milne and the animated movies from Disney Studios is regarded as an offensive character by Chinese censors because of its physical resemblance to the president, Xi Jinping.
 

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Party member fired for criticising Mao cult

SHIJIAZHUANG (AsiaNews): Zuo Chunhe, a senior Member of the Chinese Communist Party and deputy director of the Culture and News Bureau of Shijiazhuang, was dismissed from his job by the official censors for criticising the great helmsman of modern China, Mao Zedong, and for showing disrespect for his personality cult.

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China gives Internet one more squeeze

HONG KONG (UCAN): The Chinese government is set to adopt a new Cybersecurity Law, which Human Rights Watch described on November 7 as a regressive measure designed to tighten censorship, as well as closer surveillance and other controls over the Internet operations.

As was expected, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee passed the controversial law during its October 31 to November 7 meeting.

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Media censorship versus social media freedom

HONG KONG (SE): While there is a popular perception abroad that censorship in China is an across the board restriction placed on the whole population, Mu Chunsan points out in an article published in The Diplomat on September 14 that in fact, it is quite selective and tightly focussed.

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Freedom of religion for a Church in chains

HONG KONG (SE): By its very nature cyberspace transcends borders, which makes drawing territorial demarcation lines designating control over content, access or usage an almost contradictory task.

However, the United States of America (US) holds most of the keys to the doors that can lock, monitor and block, as it possesses the 13 facilities that allocate IP address, which gives it a head start in the manipulation game.

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Indonesia blocks media to gag Papuan voices

Jakarta (UCAN): Indonesia continues to restrict foreign media access to the Christian-majority provinces of Papua and West Papua, despite assurances from the president, Joko Widodo, that reporters would have unimpeded access to the region.

Human Rights Watch Asia deputy director, Phelim Kine, said that elements of the Indonesian government have failed to deliver on Widodo’s promise to open Papua to foreign reporters.

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