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Not a year to spend on the sofa

It is a new year. But it is not just another new year. It is also a Year of Youth in our diocese of Hong Kong as well as in other parts of the world like Australia. 
In fact, the Year of Youth began with the proclamation made by the bishop on the first Sunday of Advent, which traditionally marks the beginning of the new liturgical year in the Catholic Church.

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The Persecution of the Rohingya

The hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees fleeing the attacks and burning of their villages in Myanmar are walking hundreds of kilometres across mountains and through jungles in the rain to escape the slaughter by the Myanmar armed forces. 

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Parents can have special needs too

A 60-year-old father of an autistic teenager chopped his son to death after he fought with his schoolmates in June 2014. The father was sentenced to four years imprisonment on August 11 after admitting to voluntary manslaughter.

His brutal and uncontrolled response to pressure highlights the high incidence rate of deep depression suffered by parents or the carers of such children, which is often ignored by others, even the parents themselves.

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No justice in a bullet in the head or a bag

The Philippines is moving away from its former ear of compassion and justice to one where the innocent are targets for assassination and imprisonment on false charges.

In recent weeks, dozens of bodies have been found, shot dead, with signs pinned on them, declaring them criminals deserving to die.

But there was no trial, no justice. The killers have contempt for the process of justice. 

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On listening in prayer

Our prayer, especially our private prayer, should contain intervals in which we do not say anything or express any thought or feeling in words, but simply remain still and silent in the presence of God, open and receptive like a flower turning towards the light.

Prayer should be refreshment, not hard labour. What matters is not whether our periods of listening are long or short, many or few, but that they exist, because prayer is a dialogue with God, not a monologue by us.

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On listening – silence in the monastery

The Rule of St. Benedict opens with the word listen. A monk should be above all a listener, so indeed should every Christian.

But who, or what, are we to listen to? The Rule says it is to the master and our primary and ultimate master is God.

The whole spiritual life of the Christian is a process of listening to God, inclining the ear of the heart.

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A special wish on Fathers Day


ho am I?” It is a question that is fundamental to us all. Authors and screenwriters have tried to elaborate on it.

I recall a film from 1998 called, Who am I? staring Jackie Chan as a guy that sustained head injuries in a serious accident and could not remember things.

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Prayer — lifeline of the soul

What a great joy to be with God!

To be in the presence of the Triune God

Jesus Christ is just a prayer away

Make haste, and do not delay.


Dear friends, what are you waiting for?

Come down and meet your loving saviour

He is ever present in the holy tabernacle

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Pope gives a new slant on facing difficulties

Several weeks ago Walter Cardinal Kasper predicted that Pope Francis’ much-awaited document on the family would be the beginning of the biggest reform in 1,700 years.

He probably jumped the gun. But then again, it all depends which of those words you stress—beginning, biggest or reform.

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Putting the family Church forward

The apostolic exhortation on love in the family by Pope Francis, The Joy of Love (Amoris Laetitia), is a landmark document in the history of modern papal teaching.

It approaches the hot-button issues of marriage and sexuality and, even more so, contains a vision of Church.

The ecclesiology that underpins the encyclical is both collegial and synodal.