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His presence was his elocution

Christians, including many in the Catholic Church in Hong Kong adopted Liu Xiaobo as a prophet during his life time and, since his untimely death in a Chinese prison on July 13, embraced him as a martyr.
 
Liu was not a Christian or a Catholic, but his lifelong commitment to the truth and the great value he placed on the integrity of his own conscience remained the driving inspiration of his life—an inspiration that he suffered and ultimately died for.
 








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Memorial Mass for Liu Xiaobo

HONG KONG (UCAN): Over 700 people gathered on July 18 to mourn the death of the Chinese Nobel laureate, Liu Xiaobo, whom they had adopted as a prophet and embraced as a martyr when he died under police surveillance after eight years of imprisonment on July 13.
 
A memorial Mass celebrated by Father Louis Ha Ke-loon was organised by the Justice and Peace Commission at Holy Cross parish in Sai Wan Ho on July 18 with five other priests and four permanent deacons.
 

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Liu’s death has lessons for the Vatican

HONG KONG (UCAN): In lamenting the premature death of 61-year-old Liu Xiaobo at the First Hospital of the China Medical University in Shenyang on July 13, Bangkok-based Michael Sainsbury says that the world has now seen the death of one of its bravest human beings and greatest citizens of modern day China.
 

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Adopted as prophet embraced as martyr

HONG KONG (SE): The question, “Do you think the Chinese government will release him now?” that was asked on the evening of 10 December 2010 in Oslo, Norway, when an empty chair sat in its lonely position on the stage at the presentation of the Nobel Prize for Peace to Liu Xiaobo has now been definitively answered.
 

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Health of Liu Xiaobo deliberately neglected former top aide says

BEIJING (SE): Bao Tong, the former top aide to the late ousted Chinese premier, Zhao Ziyang, has hit out at the Communist Party for its tardiness in granting medical parole to jailed Nobel laureate and democracy advocate, Liu Xiaobo (Sunday Examiner, July 2). 
 

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Open letter to Xi on human rights

HONG KONG (AsiaNews): More than 100 authors from around the world have signed a letter addressed to the president of China, Xi Jinping, asking him to stop repressing writers in the country and to address the human rights violations being perpetrated against them.

The letter was delivered on the World Day for Human Rights, December 10.

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Trumpet all Nobel Laureates

The awarding of a Nobel Prize for Medicine to a Chinese research doctor, Tu Youyou, has captured the imagination of the country and in some ways turned her into of a cult hero.

The home she used to live in has sky-rocketed in value and the high school she attended over 50 years ago has become a centre of attention.








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Is Nobel Prize promoting censorship?

 

HONG KONG (UCAN): Not all Chinese people share the same taste as the Nobel Prize Committee. This was highlighted on October 13 when Mo Yan was announced as this year’s Nobel Laureate for Literature.

Mo, a pseudonym which translates as “don’t speak,” has been roundly criticised by mainland people for failing to support other Chinese writers who have been subjected to censorship by the government.

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