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A week to celebrate love

This year, in an unusual occurrence, Ash Wednesday falls on Valentine’s Day—February 14 and the first day of Chinese New Year falls on the first Friday of Lent on February 16. Catholic youngsters in particular are in a quandary: is it okay to celebrate Valentine’s Day on Ash Wednesday? 
 








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Kung Hei Fat Choi!

The rooster crows hope

On the front page of this issue of the Sunday Examiner, Christian artist, Susan Chan Siu-chu, has painted a rooster crowing in the Lunar New Year. A new beginning has come.

In traditional agricultural society, the crow of the rooster at the crack of dawn awakens the farmer, signalling the beginning of a new day of work and a new day of hope.

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Reactions to pope’s New Year overture reflect its complexity

HONG KONG (SE): There was a quick response from China to an overture from Pope Francis when he sent greetings for the Lunar New Year to the president, Xi Jinping, and the people of China in an interview published in the Hong Kong-based Internet news outlet, Asia Times, on February 2.

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Happy New Year to a great people

HONG KONG (SE): A greeting for the Lunar New Year from Pope Francis to the people of China was published on the online Hong Kong news site, Asia Times, on February 2, almost one week prior to the actual celebration of the beginning of the Year of the Monkey, which falls on February 8.

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Kung Hei Fat Choi

 

Best wishes for a happy and blessed Year of the Monkey 

 

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Learning from the monkeys

The artist whose hand created the painting on the front page of this issue, Susan Chan Siu-chu, wishes all the readers of Sunday Examiner a Year of the Monkey full of blessings and unfulfilled dreams coming true.

Chan describes the monkey as a symbol of unlimited energy and quick wit.

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A new year

 

The Romans began each year by making promises to the god, Janus, for whom the month of January is named.

In Mediaeval times, knights took the peacock vow at the end of the Christmas season each year to re-affirm their commitment to chivalry.