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Nepal newest pariah on religious freedom

KATHMANDU (UCAN): Nepal has become the latest pariah state in the religious freedom field by making religious conversion illegal.
 
Seen as specifically aimed at the Christian faith, Kathmandu has now formed a bloc alongside its two neighbours, India and Pakistan, in which the small Christian minorities are facing increasing threats from the government against their faith.
 

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Gratitude and anguish at Xi’s address

HONG KONG (UCAN): Responses from religious groups to remarks made by the president of China, Xi Jinping, during his epic address at the opening of the National Party Congress on October 18 in the Great Hall of the People vary radically, depending on which side the political fence they originate from.
 

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Bans on children attending Church

HONG KONG (UCAN): The Communist Party is continuing to tighten its grip on the practice of religion with at least four regional governments across China issuing notices in late August restricting children from joining Christian groups or attending religious activities.
 

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Is Christianity a blight on the religious ecology of China?

HONG KONG (SE): A leading scholar in the study of religion within a framework of what is referred to as a Chinese religious ecology, Mou Zhongjian, credits what he calls the wrong-headed policies of Mao Zedong with setting the stage for the revival of Christianity in the 1980s after the country began to open up.
 

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Priest banned from travelling abroad

HANOI (UCAN): Redemptorist Father John Nguyen Ngoc Nam Phong, who is known for his human rights advocacy campaigns for social justice, has been barred from leaving Vietnam for national security reasons.
 
A Church person said that the priest from Thai Ha parish in Hanoi was stopped at Hanoi’s Noi Bai Airport as he was checking in on a flight to Australia for study laave on June 27.
 

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Wenzhou bishop still held

SHANGHAI (AsiaNews): A particular intention on May 24, the day set aside for the past decade for prayer for the Church in China, was the release of Bishop Peter Shao Zhumin, from Wenzhou in Zhejiang.
 
The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians was designated by Pope Benedict XVI as the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China in his letter to the Catholic people of the mainland in May 2007.
 

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Time to take up the cross again

WENZHOU (UCAN): The province of Zhejiang has been through a highly controversial period over the past four years, as Christians have been forced to watch more than 1,700 crosses being removed from Church buildings by government authorities.
 
But now that the secretary of the Communist Party that gave the demolition orders is moving on, some people think that it is time to take up the cross again.
 

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Unofficial Church worried over investment in city

HONG KONG (UCAN): The unofficial Catholic community in the northern Hebei province of China is worried that an enormous economic project will increase government suppression of their faith.
 
In one of the cities that will be affected by the proposed Xiongan New District development, Catholics say that they believe the government will use the project to act against the Church.
 

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Unregistered religion under the hammer

HONG KONG (SE): Government interference in religion is growing in China, with authorities suppressing Islam and denigrating Christian teachings as a foreign import, a report released by Freedom House on February 28 maintains.

Radio Free Asia quoted the report as saying that to the detriment of Christianity and Islam, Beijing is promoting Chinese Buddhism and Taoism, as it sees them as being more supportive of traditional notions of loyalty to the state.

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