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The Sinicisation of priestly formation

Following is a translation from the Chinese original of the report on concerning
formation courses held in Beijing for the priests of the Diocese of Mindong (Fujian)
who joined the Patriotic Association.
It was drafted by Deng Wenlong, a member of the Patriotic Association of Fujian
 
 
 

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China censors God and Bible from textbooks

HONG KONG (UCAN): Foreign textbooks translated into Putonghua for sixth-grade students in China have had religious references expunged, according to media reports. The removal of any mention of God and Bible have especially horrified Christians.
 

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Concerns as Chinese authorities ban religious education

HONG KONG (UCAN): Authorities in mainland China are exerting a clampdown on Christian activities in the country, spreading fear among some Church members about their long-term futures. Dioceses in China have been receiving constant warnings about a prohibition on summer camps and many local churches have been pressured into giving up all related activities.
 
Some people worry about the impact this will have on Church development.
 

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China’s state-aligned Catholic organisations tell US to back off

HONG KONG (UCAN): Responding to the second Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom of the United States (US) State Department, held in Washington DC from July 16 to 18, the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association (CPA) and the Bishops’ Conference of the Catholic Church in China (BCCCC) and other officially sanctioned religious organisations in China say the gathering “maliciously hyped” China’s ethnic and religious policies.
 

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Control of book publishing political obsession in China

HONG KONG (UCAN): China has introduced tough new restrictions on the publication and distribution of books.
 
Updated regulations list 65 kinds of content, which are strictly prohibited or need prior approval, including eight related to ethnic and religious affairs.
 
From March, authorities have required a content review of all books published since last year in the fields of literature, works for children and textbooks, including so-called popular science.
 

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Former prisoner for her beliefs guides others to faith

SYDNEY (CNS): Teresa Liu. who spent 20 years imprisoned in China for being a faithful Catholic, has helped hundreds of Chinese migrants convert to the faith in Australia. Now 86-years-old and living in Sydney, she was imprisoned in Guangzhou from 1957 to 1977 by China’s communist government.
 
She was never given a trial and spent some of her sentence in solitary confinement—at one point for a period of seven months.
 

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China Bridge: Contradictions at the top?

Catholics outside of China are baffled by an apparent contradiction about the religious policy towards the Catholic Church between different departments in the top echelons of the Chinese government. 
 








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News suppressed as China’s Christians come under increased pressure

HONG KONG (UCAN): As the Chinese government continues to suppress religious freedom, Christianity is facing the forcible removal of crosses and demolition of churches across the vast nation.
 
However, threatened by the authorities and fearing retaliation, some members of Catholic Church dare not disclose what is happening to the outside world, causing a blackout of all news on the subject.
 

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Tracing the history of Catholic finances in China

HONG KONG (UCAN): Kang Zhijie, a scholar of Chinese Christian studies, has published Financial and Economic Studies of Chinese Catholicism (1582-1949), the first book on the finances of the Catholic Church in China prior to 1949, which also covers tensions between a sacred religion and a secular economy.
 

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Vatican tells China clergy to follow their conscience

VATICAN (CNS): The Vatican has told bishops and priests in China that they must follow their own consciences in deciding whether to register with the government and it urged Catholics in the country not to judge them for the choices they make.
 
The Vatican said the problem is that registration almost always requires the bishop or priest to accept “the principle of independence, autonomy and self-administration of the Church in China,” which could be read as a denial of one’s bonds with the pope and the universal Church.

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