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The Holy See, China and the question of sovereignty

by Michel Chambon
 
In the past few weeks, rumours have spread about a possible agreement between the Holy See and the People’s Republic of China. In an uncommon move, the Vatican has even asked two bishops from the unofficial Church to shift aside for two official bishops initially appointed by Beijing.
 

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Caution versus compassion impasse continues

HONG KONG (SE): Joseph Cardinal Zen Ze-kiun, the former bishop of Hong Kong has not spared efforts and words to explain how Vatican officials do not understand the true nature of Chinese leaders and that their rush will harm the church in China. 
 
His recent meeting with the press at the Salesian Mission House, Shau Kei Wan, on February 9 highlighted that China does not respect religious freedom and worry that Pope Francis may involuntarily betray the underground side of the Catholic Church in China.
 

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New book on Jesuits in China

SYDNEY (UCAN): A first in publishing on China, the two-volume A Call to Mission: A History of the Jesuits in China 1842-1954 was launched in Sydney, Australia, on February 19.
 
Jesuit Father David Strong, the author, spent 15 years writing and researching material covering three continents in this work which covers the second phase of the Jesuit engagement with China. 
 

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New regulations squeeze violates China constitution

HONG KONG (UCAN): With China’s new regulations for religious affairs having come into effect on February 1, the squeeze is on. Minors have already been banned from entering places of worship in several regions, while Protestant house churches in Henan province have been forced to close (Sunday Examiner, February 11). 
 
Joseph Cardinal Zen Ze-kiun, former bishop of Hong Kong, said that one source informed him there would be no Mass at an unofficial church in Shanghai.
 

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Holy See-China accord in the offing but at what cost?

HONG KONG (SE): An accord between the Holy See and the People’s Republic of China “is almost made” and could be signed in the coming months, thereby opening a new phase in the relations between them, according to a senior Vatican source informed on the negotiations between the two sides.
 

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Young people the first victims of new religious regulations

BEIJING (AsiaNews): the revised version of China’s Religious Affairs Regulations went into effect on February 1. First published last October, they provide for close monitoring of all official Church communities and fines, arrests and expropriation for members of unofficial communities. Among the first victims of this clampdown are young people.
 

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Vatican laments confusion and controversy over Church in China

HONG KONG (SE): Greg Burke, the director of the Holy See Press Office, has denied recent allegations of the Vatican selling out the Catholic Church in China in a statement published on Zenit.org on January 30.
 
The Vatican spokesperson denounced the widespread news of a presumed difference of thought and action between the Holy Father and his collaborators in the Roman Curia on issues relating to China.
 

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Shanghai priest appointed to political committee

SHANGHAI (AsiaNews): Father Ignatius Wu Jianlin, a priest at the head of the team that leads the diocese of Shanghai, was recently appointed a member of 13th National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC). 
 

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Greater rights awareness needed with new religious regulations

HONG KONG (UCAN): China’s new and stricter Regulations for Religious Affair came into force on February 1. Stricter provisions include those covering official registration of places used for religious purposes. 
 
Apart from setting out requirements for sanctioned religious venues, the new framework, covers with areas such as education, as well as property rights and legal liability.
 

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Greater rights awareness needed with new religious regulations

HONG KONG (UCAN): China’s new and stricter Regulations for Religious Affair came into force on February 1. Stricter provisions include those covering official registration of places used for religious purposes. 
 
Apart from setting out requirements for sanctioned religious venues, the new framework, covers with areas such as education, as well as property rights and legal liability.
 

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