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Kazakh students detained in Xinjiang

HOTAN (UCAN): Authorities in China’s Xinjiang region are thought to be detaining ethnic minority Kazakhs for wearing Islamic clothing and praying, a practice forbidden by the Communist Party on university campuses.
 
Radio Free Asia reported Kazakh sources as estimating that more than 20 Kazakhs have gone missing—believed detained—and details are only available on a few of them.
 

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Church demolition sparks fireworks in Shanxi

CHANGZHI (SE): Dozens of people turned out on August 29 in an effort to stop the demolition of a church in Wangcun, a few kilometres from Changzhi, in southeastern Shanxi province.
 
AsiaNews reported that people cried out, “Jesus save me!” and “Mother Mary, have pity on us!” as they tried to obstruct a bulldozer and the police who were trying to protect it as it carried its destructive mission.
 

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Bans on children attending Church

HONG KONG (UCAN): The Communist Party is continuing to tighten its grip on the practice of religion with at least four regional governments across China issuing notices in late August restricting children from joining Christian groups or attending religious activities.
 

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Monks’ residence gets the ax

HONG KONG (SE): The government in the Sichuan province of China has begun pulling down 2,000 residences used by Tibetan clergy at the Yachen Gar Buddhist Centre.
 
Radio Free Asia reports that it is expected that an equal number of monks and nuns will be kicked out of the complex by the end of the year. “Chinese authorities ordered the demolition of 2,000 houses of monks and nuns at Yachen Buddhist Centre this year,” Radio Free Asia was told.
 

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A threatened life of service

Theresa is an unusual type of person in the Catholic Church. Although everyone in her parish in China addresses her as Sister and recognises her as a religious, she is in fact a lay person, although not quite the conventional type.
 
Theresa belongs to the tradition of consecrated virgins, Catholic women who choose to remain celibate for their whole lives. They do not join a religious congregation and usually work under the direction of the local bishop.
 








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A Church in need of support

HONG KONG (SE): In a call to the universal Church to give its support in any way it can, Father Sergio Ticozzi says that a recent visit to the mainland has left him quite rattled at seeing the difficulties that Catholic people are facing in their everyday faith lives.
 

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Chinese translation of St. Faustina’s life

HONG KONG (UCAN): Lam Kit-ping has translated the biography of St. Faustina Kowalska of Poland into Chinese in the hope of spreading her message of mercy throughout mainland China.
 
Lam lives in Hong Kong and is a member of the Secular Institute Ancelle Mater Misericodiae. She worked on the translation in conjunction with people in Taiwan.
 
She said that she was moved by the biographies of Pope John Paul II and St. Faustina and since then has made annual pilgrimages to Poland where the two were born.

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Restrictions in Xinjiang tighten

HONG KONG (SE): Persecution in the Xinjiang area of China of the tiny group of Muslim Kyrgyz people has reached a new level with re-education centres being opened for those who violate religious laws.
 
Radio Free Asia reported on August 23 that the small group is facing similar restrictions as the majority Uyghur people.
 

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The censorship polemic

HONG KONG (SE): After the Cambridge University Press confirmed publicly that it had received an instruction from a Chinese import agency to block individual articles from The China Quarterly within China, it said on August 18 that it would comply for the sake of being able to make the bulk of its material available (Sunday Examiner, August 27), but would not change its editorial line to appease China.
 

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